Woyzeck- Old Vic.

Tonight I saw Woyzeck at the Old Vic, starring John Boyega. Woyzeck by Georg Büchner is an exploration on how War affects young minds, and the lengths people will go to escape the clasp of poverty. Set in the rage of the Cold War and the war in Belfast, this new adaptation by Joe Murphy, brings all the tension and life of war to the stage.

I absolutely loved this production.  The industrial set, had a sinister air to it, paired with the lighting and the ominous music, it all became a bit of a sensory overload. I was overwhelmed with dread, and fear, which just encompassed the whole theatre, and set the tone perfectly.

John Boyega’s Woyzeck was loveable, but complex. The character constantly surprised me. And I can’t imagine how physically taxing that role would be on him. After the run finishes he said he would be taking a well deserved holiday. Ben Batt’s Andrews, brought a needed comedic break to the drama. Also the relationship between Boyega’s Woyzeck, and Sarah Greene’s Marie was so perfect. And the development, or perhaps deterioration was so clear and concise.

The thing I loved most about this production, apart from the set, has to be the direction. There was such a clear vision in this show, which I don’t seem to see a lot of.  The second act was so confusing. I could not tell what was real or not, this was enhanced by the lighting and the set, where the attention to detail was remarkable. You were really transported into Woyzeck’s mind. I felt stressed, and anxious, and scared. I had no idea how I was going to react to this show, and I just wanted to go home and curl up. It stressed me out. And I think that’s fantastic!

It closes this week so, if you get the chance, please go check it out.

 

 

Twelfth Night- National Theatre.

So tonight I went to see Twelfth Night, at the National. Another Review (lucky you, dear reader… Or Unlucky, depending on how you feel). This production, stars Tamsin Grieg, and turns the show on it’s head, into a wonderful, fast paced, and colourful queer-fest.

Directed by Simon Godwin, this new adaptation brings new life to the old classic.  It begins, with a simple, but effective outline of a ship. The attention in detail in this production was fantastic, from the way they made the smoke, seem like water, to the faint cricket’s chirping in the background in the scenes. The sound, and music was wonderful, and made the play not unlike a musical, with songs and music, aiding to the drama and the transitions. The transitions were very slick, mostly due to the fantastic set. Almost like a clock, the ‘ship’ rotated, to reveal different spaces in the island. And the dressing of the set was brilliant, again the attention to detail was fantastic. Each space, had a completely different feel to it.

The cast were brilliant of course. Tamara Lawrance, Viola, brought a brilliant innocence, to the role, whilst playing her fiercely, and wise. And her chemistry with Oliver Chris, Orsino, both as Cesario and Viola, bringing another aspect to the play, that I had completely disregarded. That Orsino, was so determined to marry Olivia, because he had feelings for Cesario. Oliver Chris, was a brilliant Orsino, and brought a David Tennant-ish quality to the role, somewhat reminiscent of Benedick. However, Daniel Rigby, Sir Andrew Aguecheek, and Tim McMullan, Sir Toby Belch, were fantastic. They were both energetic, bringing more comedy to the show. With the drunken energy, coming from McMullan, and an innocence to the ‘tyrants’ coming from Rigby.  Imogen Doel, Fabia, or the Fool, brought the whole piece together, with a beautiful voice, and fantastic physicality in her acting. Malvolia, Tamsin Greig, was of course brilliant, her Malvolia, was stern, but still, somehow, likeable. And her ‘burlesque’ reveal of the yellow stockings was worthy of it’s own act.

All the gender-bending in this production was really great, and highlighted so many different relationships, and emotions that are often tossed aside in this play. Although, it may have dawdled in parts. This production was brilliant, because it was fun – it didn’t take itself too seriously, and every detail was thought of- from the costumes, to the bottles that Sir Toby drunk from.