Twelfth Night- National Theatre.

So tonight I went to see Twelfth Night, at the National. Another Review (lucky you, dear reader… Or Unlucky, depending on how you feel). This production, stars Tamsin Grieg, and turns the show on it’s head, into a wonderful, fast paced, and colourful queer-fest.

Directed by Simon Godwin, this new adaptation brings new life to the old classic.  It begins, with a simple, but effective outline of a ship. The attention in detail in this production was fantastic, from the way they made the smoke, seem like water, to the faint cricket’s chirping in the background in the scenes. The sound, and music was wonderful, and made the play not unlike a musical, with songs and music, aiding to the drama and the transitions. The transitions were very slick, mostly due to the fantastic set. Almost like a clock, the ‘ship’ rotated, to reveal different spaces in the island. And the dressing of the set was brilliant, again the attention to detail was fantastic. Each space, had a completely different feel to it.

The cast were brilliant of course. Tamara Lawrance, Viola, brought a brilliant innocence, to the role, whilst playing her fiercely, and wise. And her chemistry with Oliver Chris, Orsino, both as Cesario and Viola, bringing another aspect to the play, that I had completely disregarded. That Orsino, was so determined to marry Olivia, because he had feelings for Cesario. Oliver Chris, was a brilliant Orsino, and brought a David Tennant-ish quality to the role, somewhat reminiscent of Benedick. However, Daniel Rigby, Sir Andrew Aguecheek, and Tim McMullan, Sir Toby Belch, were fantastic. They were both energetic, bringing more comedy to the show. With the drunken energy, coming from McMullan, and an innocence to the ‘tyrants’ coming from Rigby.  Imogen Doel, Fabia, or the Fool, brought the whole piece together, with a beautiful voice, and fantastic physicality in her acting. Malvolia, Tamsin Greig, was of course brilliant, her Malvolia, was stern, but still, somehow, likeable. And her ‘burlesque’ reveal of the yellow stockings was worthy of it’s own act.

All the gender-bending in this production was really great, and highlighted so many different relationships, and emotions that are often tossed aside in this play. Although, it may have dawdled in parts. This production was brilliant, because it was fun – it didn’t take itself too seriously, and every detail was thought of- from the costumes, to the bottles that Sir Toby drunk from.

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Amadeus – National Theatre

Tonight I went to see Amadeus, at the National, after trying to get a ticket for ages. Amadeus by Peter Shaffer, follows the story of Antonio Salieri and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in the 1700s.

The music, as expected, was spectacular. Having the musicians on stage is a great touch, and blurred the lines between theatre and concert.  The musicians also made up the chorus, and the ensemble movement pieces, were a nice touch, stopping it from becoming a two-man show. Speaking of the two men. Lucian Msamti, Salieri, was great, his powerful stature, meant that he addressed the audience with confidence, and in the second half, truly had power. Adam Gillan, Mozart, brought the youthfulness that the show needed, with it being set in the 1700s, this was all aided by the little modern elements, that were shown every once in a while. Where Msamati spoke to the audience, Gillan, commanded the audience, or he pandered to them – I honestly can’t tell. I loved it though. It lightened up the piece, and the language, felt more 21st century, rather than 18th.  On the other hand, Karla Crome, Constanze, was also brilliant, her presence was more subtle than her counterpart, Gillan, however just as powerful. Also Fleur de Bray, Katherina, had a glass shattering voice.

The musicians stayed on stage, for most of the show, in an orchestra set-up. The centre of the stage dipped for the performances of the operas. There was also a permanent secondary stage located at the back of stage, and in moments of climax it was pulled forward, shrouding the audience in some sort of angelic light. Michael Longhurst, the director, made no effort to hide that it is a theatrical production, with the costumes visible on stage, and the vintage, operatic style, backdrops.

 

Overall a very modern look, on a classic story. Showing a rollercoaster of human emotion and human life. The madness of genius.