Half A Sixpence.

I went to see Half a Sixpence tonight at the Noel Coward Theatre, starring Charlie Stemp. Half a sixpence is a classic rag to riches story concerning humble Kent man, Arthur Kipps, and the love triangle he manages to get stuck in the middle of.

As the show started, the overture began with banjos. This made me quite dubious, a musical overture beginning with banjos? However, the music transitioned into a very classical musical genre. Which, of course, is very catchy, although not particularly unique.  However a few songs did stick out to me, due to the emotional performances from the cast.

Stemp’s Kipps, is naïve, a tad daft, but extremely lovable. His childish allure, shines throughout the performance and brought so much energy to the show. I just wanted to hug him throughout the whole performance. The whole cast complimented each other, and the chemistry between all the apprentices was very playful, and their scenes were always enjoyable to watch. I really did enjoy the show; it was extremely feel good. It had me smiling throughout the whole show.

Although I do want to mention, also because I know it was a controversy during the casting process – It was extremely white. I do think Stemp was a perfect fit for Kipps, however the whole cast of 28 is seemingly white (I don’t want to assume anyone’s nationality). I don’t believe that they didn’t see any POC that were suitable for the show. And if an excuse is that there weren’t that many POC in 1904- They also didn’t break into song and dance in 1904…

Politics aside, I did enjoy the show immensely, and would recommend for a fun light hearted night. However, I would campaign for more diversity in the West End, as it is so ridiculously important, across so many shows. This one was just glaringly obvious

Woyzeck- Old Vic.

Tonight I saw Woyzeck at the Old Vic, starring John Boyega. Woyzeck by Georg Büchner is an exploration on how War affects young minds, and the lengths people will go to escape the clasp of poverty. Set in the rage of the Cold War and the war in Belfast, this new adaptation by Joe Murphy, brings all the tension and life of war to the stage.

I absolutely loved this production.  The industrial set, had a sinister air to it, paired with the lighting and the ominous music, it all became a bit of a sensory overload. I was overwhelmed with dread, and fear, which just encompassed the whole theatre, and set the tone perfectly.

John Boyega’s Woyzeck was loveable, but complex. The character constantly surprised me. And I can’t imagine how physically taxing that role would be on him. After the run finishes he said he would be taking a well deserved holiday. Ben Batt’s Andrews, brought a needed comedic break to the drama. Also the relationship between Boyega’s Woyzeck, and Sarah Greene’s Marie was so perfect. And the development, or perhaps deterioration was so clear and concise.

The thing I loved most about this production, apart from the set, has to be the direction. There was such a clear vision in this show, which I don’t seem to see a lot of.  The second act was so confusing. I could not tell what was real or not, this was enhanced by the lighting and the set, where the attention to detail was remarkable. You were really transported into Woyzeck’s mind. I felt stressed, and anxious, and scared. I had no idea how I was going to react to this show, and I just wanted to go home and curl up. It stressed me out. And I think that’s fantastic!

It closes this week so, if you get the chance, please go check it out.