Amadeus – National Theatre

Tonight I went to see Amadeus, at the National, after trying to get a ticket for ages. Amadeus by Peter Shaffer, follows the story of Antonio Salieri and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in the 1700s.

The music, as expected, was spectacular. Having the musicians on stage is a great touch, and blurred the lines between theatre and concert.  The musicians also made up the chorus, and the ensemble movement pieces, were a nice touch, stopping it from becoming a two-man show. Speaking of the two men. Lucian Msamti, Salieri, was great, his powerful stature, meant that he addressed the audience with confidence, and in the second half, truly had power. Adam Gillan, Mozart, brought the youthfulness that the show needed, with it being set in the 1700s, this was all aided by the little modern elements, that were shown every once in a while. Where Msamati spoke to the audience, Gillan, commanded the audience, or he pandered to them – I honestly can’t tell. I loved it though. It lightened up the piece, and the language, felt more 21st century, rather than 18th.  On the other hand, Karla Crome, Constanze, was also brilliant, her presence was more subtle than her counterpart, Gillan, however just as powerful. Also Fleur de Bray, Katherina, had a glass shattering voice.

The musicians stayed on stage, for most of the show, in an orchestra set-up. The centre of the stage dipped for the performances of the operas. There was also a permanent secondary stage located at the back of stage, and in moments of climax it was pulled forward, shrouding the audience in some sort of angelic light. Michael Longhurst, the director, made no effort to hide that it is a theatrical production, with the costumes visible on stage, and the vintage, operatic style, backdrops.

 

Overall a very modern look, on a classic story. Showing a rollercoaster of human emotion and human life. The madness of genius.

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Wish List – Royal Court

I went to see Wish List today at the Royal Court Theatre. Wish List, directed by Mathew Xia, provides a commentary on the benefits system and lack of care for people facing mental health issues in the United Kingdom.

The play was staged in Traverse, which I personally love, as it is so much more intimate and intense, than traditional staging. The set was simple, but effective, with the left shrouded in boxes, representing the factory, and the right, showing a simple kitchen and bathroom. The centre was left empty, and was adapted to depending on the scene. The scene transitions were inventive and fun – keeping the pace of the show fast and to the times. The music aided the transitions, keeping the show light at some times, however, almost unbearable to watch at other times. It portrayed the franticness of someone dealing with mental issues, without relying solely on body language.

The show made me feel very anxious and left me frazzled as I left the theatre. Erin Doherty (Tamsin) and Joseph Quinn (Dean) shone through their respective roles, important, as the show mainly depended on them. The comedic elements, were timed well, and a welcome break from the intensity of the show. However, there were, at times, I felt the play was trying to tackle too many problems at once, and lost the focus and message of the play.

There were lots of little details that I loved, such as the symbolism of the hair gel, or the fact the bathroom doors had no handles on the outside, so it could only be opened from the inside. Overall, I didn’t feel good coming out of the theatre. I felt anxious, scared, upset, and frazzled. I didn’t like how I was feeling, which was important. I didn’t enjoy the show, that doesn’t mean I didn’t like it. I loved it.